The ADHD Weekly Blog from ADHD Experts

  • Non-Stimulant ADHD Medication (Guanfacine) as an Adjunct to ADHD Stimulant Medications

    ADHD stimulant medications can be supplemented with ADHD non-stimulant medications for more tailored effects without increasing identical side effects. This study in guanfacine is an example of a beginning of research for ADHD in Adults.
  • Supplementary GXR for Adult ADHD

    Psychiatry Research 2016 236:136-141. DOI: 10.1016/j.psychres.2015.12.017 “Supplementary guanfacine hydrochloride as a treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in adults: A double blind, placebo-controlled study.” Butterfield ME, Saal J, Young B, Young JI. Guanfacine hydrochloride is a selective alpha-2A partial agonist that is FDA approved for the treatment of ADHD in children and adolescents (see recent reviews by Faraone et al, 2013; Hirota et al, 2014 and Ruggiero et al
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  • ADHD in Older Adults – The Next Clinical Frontier

    As ADHD Adults grow older, clinicians and researchers are learning more about how ADHD symptoms change through the lifespan and how to differentiate ADHD in Older Adults from other aging conditions.
  • Adult Onset ADHD

    Adult Onset ADHD: Does it Exist? Is it Distinct from Youth Onset ADHD? There is a growing interest (and controversy) about ‘adult’ onset ADHD. No current diagnostic system allows for the diagnosis of ADHD in adulthood, yet clinicians sometimes face adults who meet all criteria for ADHD, except for age at onset. Although many of these clinically referred adult onset cases may reflect poor recall, several recent longitudinal population studies have claimed to detect cases of adult onset ADHD
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  • Is ADHD Always a Childhood Onset Disorder?

    Is ADHD Always a Childhood Onset Disorder? by Joseph Biederman, MD - August 4, 2016 Recent population based studies raise the intriguing question as to whether adult ADHD is always preceded by childhood onset of symptoms or can develop anew in adult life. From Brazil, one group argues that child and adult ADHD are “distinct syndromes”; from the United Kingdom (UK), another group states that adult ADHD is “more complex than a straightforward continuation of the childhood disorder” and from
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  • Adult Onset ADHD: Does it Exist? Is it Distinct from Youth Onset ADHD?

    Adult Onset ADHD: Does it Exist? Is it Distinct from Youth Onset ADHD? by Stephen V. Faraone, PhD - August 4, 2016 There is a growing interest (and controversy) about ‘adult’ onset ADHD. No current diagnostic system allows for the diagnosis of ADHD in adulthood, yet clinicians sometimes face adults who meet all criteria for ADHD, except for age at onset. Although many of these clinically referred adult onset cases may reflect poor recall, several recent longitudinal population studies
    Read more
  • ADHD Parenting among ADHD Adults

    Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. 2014. DOI: 10.1080/15374416.2014.963858 “The Role of Parental ADHD in Sustaining the Effects of a Family-School Intervention for ADHD” Dawson, A.E., Wymbs, B.T., Marshall, S.A., Mautone, J.A., Power, T.J. This paper reports on the extent to which parental ADHD impacts child and parent functional outcomes of a multimodal family-school intervention designed to boost academic performance of 139 school-aged children with
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  • ADHD CME for Primary Care Professionals

    ADHD in Adults.com provides ADHD CME training for physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, physicians assistants, psychiatrists, social workers and more. Provided by ADHD experts from APSARD.
  • ADHD Coaching an Integral Component of Effective Comprehensive Treatment for Adults with ADHD

    ADHD Coaching is a significant and important adjunct to ADHD treatment as part of a multi-modal approach. ADHD coaches are very adept at motivating their clients who have ADHD, while partnering with them to develop and practice newly learned personal, soc
  • African American Adults with ADHD – Cultural Barriers and Reduced Access to Care

    Cultural history and bias between psychiatry and the African American community lead to less recognition of the symptoms of ADHD, less use of ADHD medication, and reduced access to care.

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